Spring Collection Inspiration: Hilma af Klint

Toys for the Emerging Artist


Hilma af Klint in her studio


Hilma af Klint began abstract painting in 1906. Her paintings were inspired by the natural world, her spirituality, and an interest in sacred geometry.



Left to right. (1.) Hilma af Klint - The Ten Largest, No. 1, Childhood, Group IV, 1907, (2.) The Ten Largest, No. 4 Youth (1907), (3.) The Ten Largest, No. 6, Adulthood, Group IV, 1907



After studying painting in Stockholm, Hilma later joined a group of artists and spiritualists called "The Five". Unlike many artists of her time, Hilma kept her life's work a secret for many years. She asked that her work wouldn't be shown until 20 years after her death. Bright, colorful, and prophetic, Hilma af Klint's work is truly inspiring. To honor her contribution to painting and art history, we grounded our Spring Collection in elements of nature she often chose to represent in a simple, geometric style. This limited edition collection of toys is designed by Sarah specifically for the young, emerging artist.






Creative Activities Inspired by Hilma af Klint


1. Many of Hilma's paintings depict geometric shapes ranging from swirling spirals to sharp triangles and squares. You may share and encourage this style of art making with your children by spreading out a large piece of craft paper on the floor or a tabletop and have your child practice shapes in all sizes and colors!





2.  Hilma wrote that her work was inspired by her unconscious and she often worked with no initial concept to connect with her subconscious. A great way for children to make their own unconscious drawings, is by drawing or painting blindfolded or simply with their eyes closed! Have an adult present and layout a large piece of craft paper for your child to work on. Connecting with one's imagination may deepen while being sightless!







3. Finally, Hilma's abstract paintings were focused on shapes found in nature. The swirl of a snail shell or the globe of a planet are symbols found often in her work. An easy way for children to learn more about abstraction in art is to collect beautiful things they find outside on a nature walk. Your little one may gather plants, rocks, and empty snail shells. Once the child has gathered a variety of objects from nature, you may have them choose one to draw in a simplified way. Maybe they are inspired by the color, shape, or texture of their object. By simplifying your natural treasures one can learn the basics of abstract art!







xoxo,

Sarah & Annabelle



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